Lilongwe

Days 1 - 2

Resting on the banks of the Lilongwe River, the sprawling, bustling city of Lilongwe serves as the capital of Malawi. It is the largest city in Malawi and is the economic and transport hub of the country. It features thriving markets, lush green spaces, and a rich cultural heritage. While the city has all of the twentieth-century urban developments, it retains the appearance of a traditional African settlement. The Lilongwe Wildlife Centre, in the heart of Lilongwe, provides a sanctuary for local wildlife seeking refuge. Other sights worth seeing include the Kumbali Cultural Centre, offering the opportunity to view traditional Malawian dancing and drumming; as well as the nearby Chongoni Rock Art Area featuring over 127 sites displaying ancient rock art.

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Lilongwe

South Luangwa National Park

Days 2 - 4

Bordering the Luangwa River, the northern and southern Luangwa National Parks contain some of the most breathtaking and untouched wilderness in Africa. As a result of this and the parks’ successful anti-poaching campaigns, the area has developed into a world-renowned wildlife haven. The South Luangwa National Park is renowned for its walking safari, which allows visitors to view elephant, hippo and even lion close-up under the supervision of professional and knowledgeable armed guides.

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South Luangwa National Park

South Luangwa National Park

Days 4 - 6

As previously described

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South Luangwa National Park

South Luangwa National Park

Days 6 - 7

As previously described

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South Luangwa National Park

Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve

Days 7 - 10

Stretching from the Great Rift Valley in the west towards spectacular Lake Malawi in the east, Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve is Malawi’s oldest and least-developed protected area. One of Malawi’s largest game reserves, Nkhotakota provides a habitat for an abundance of game, including lion, elephant, buffalo, antelope and much more. This rugged wilderness of forests, rivers and grasslands lends itself to a variety of activities, including hiking, fishing, bird watching and rock climbing. The reserve encompasses a number of camps, but an alternative option is to stay at one of the lodges on the shores of beautiful Lake Malawi and take a day trip into the reserve.

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Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve

Nyika National Park

Days 10 - 13

Located along the Zambian border in northern Malawi, the Nyika National Park features forested valleys, lush woodlands, and vast grasslands. It is Malawi’s largest park extending across the great plateau which rises up to 1800 metres. Aside from conventional safaris, Nyika is wonderful for walking, mountain biking and horse riding safaris, and 4x4 excursions. It is not just the game that attracts visitors, the rolling scenery is often covered in wildflowers and in the rainy season, there are over 200 types of orchid in flower. Commonly spotted wildlife include duiker, eland, roan, leopard, zebra, lion, elephant, buffalo as well as over 400 bird species.

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Nyika National Park

Likoma Island

Days 13 - 16

Although in Mozambican waters, Likoma Island is Malawian territory. It is the larger of the two inhabited islands in Lake Malawi, measuring seventeen square kilometres. It boasts some lovely beaches, friendly locals, and predominantly flat terrain with a baobab dotted south. It is home to the headquarters of the University Mission to Central Africa, Livingstone’s mission, and hence it remained British territory when the Lake was divided politically after World War Two. The island is famous for its large cathedral, St. Peter's Cathedral, featuring numerous stained glass and carved intricate soapstone details. Visitors can look forward to relaxing on pristine beaches, snorkelling and diving in the crystal-clear waters, as well as enjoying a variety of watersports.

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Likoma Island
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